How To Make Zesty Italian Vinaigrette Dressing

100221-164853_Med

I grew up thinking “vinaigrette” just meant oil and vinegar. I also thought it didn’t matter much what kind of vegetable oil you were using, and the only kind of vinegar was white distilled. Not surprisingly, I couldn’t understand why would anyone want that on their salad. So I used the “creamy” stuff in bottles … which of course didn’t have any cream in them. (Rule of thumb: If the label on the front says “creamy” the ingredients listed on the back probably won’t.)

Then a couple of years ago I discovered extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Wow. Now I can’t understand anyone wanting the stuff in bottles.

Soon after I discovered balsamic vinegar, I started noticing just how many kinds of vinegar there are: cider, red wine, white wine, rice, malt … Lots and lots of options here.

But I was still mostly just pouring the oil and vinegar over my salads. Then one day I hit it with the immersion blender first. It didn’t just mix the oil and vinegar, it completely changed the texture. It became creamy. I had discovered emulsion, the same thing that turns oil, vinegar and eggs into mayonnaise.

Ingredients

1½-2 cups extra virgin olive oil
½ cup white wine vinegar
4-6 cloves garlic
1 teaspoon each:
* black peppercorns
* kosher salt
* dry basil
* dry oregano
* dry parsley
* mustard powder
* 1-2 teaspoons sugar (optional, see below)

Directions

Peel the garlic and cut the hard part of the stems off. Put them in your food processor along with the peppercorns, salt, and a half-cup of the olive oil.


Blend until the garlic and pepper are both ground really well.

Now add the rest of the herbs — and the sugar, if you want it — another half-cup of olive oil, and the vinegar.



Blend well, and you should notice the texture starting to thicken up.

Keep adding oil and blending, tasting after each round, until you like the consistency. (If you have a food processor that you can add ingredients while it’s going, pour the oil in a thin stream while blending constantly.) Then pour it out into a serving bowl.

I would have added a little more oil, but I ran out of room in the food processor. You can see now how much thicker it is.

This is good on salads, or as a veggie dip.

See all those yummy herbs?

Serve immediately, or store in the fridge in an airtight container for 2-3 weeks. It will still be good longer than that, but will eventually start to separate back into oil and vinegar.

And that’s it.

Oh, remember when I said the sugar was optional? As a dressing or dip, this does need some sugar to balance the tartness of the vinegar and herbs. If you substitute balsamic vinegar, that’s already sweet enough on its own. And if you’re planning to use this as a marinade, you can just skip the sugar altogether.

Zesty Italian Vinaigrette Dressing

Zesty Italian Vinaigrette Dressing

Ingredients

  • 1½-2 cups extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup white wine vinegar
  • 4-6 cloves garlic
  • 1 teaspoon each:
  • * black peppercorns
  • * kosher salt
  • * dry basil
  • * dry oregano
  • * dry parsley
  • * mustard powder
  • * 1-2 teaspoons sugar

Instructions

Combine garlic, salt, peppercorns and a half-cup olive oil in a food processor. Process until the garlic and peppercorns are well crushed.

Add the remaining herbs and sugar, the vinegar, and another half-cup of olive oil and blend again. The dressing should start to thicken up.

Add olive oil and continue blending until it reaches the consistency you want. Taste frequently to make sure you don't add too much oil and dilute the flavor.

Serve immediately, or store in the refrigerator in an airtight container for 2-3 weeks. It will still be good after that, but will start to separate.

Comments

  1. Great recipe…!

    Just try and find bottled salad dressing in the supermarket that is made with anything but Canola oil. Canola (a advertising designed name previously trademarked) comes from genetically formulated rapeseed plant. Over 80% of canola comes fr0m a genetically engineered plants (made more resistant to weed killers). Sixty years ago it was used to lubricate steam engines. Pretty slick.

  2. This is great! I’ve never gotten the hang of vinegar and oil dressings, they always separate into blobs and are disgusting to me. I’ve never tried putting them in the processor. I assume a blender would also do the trick? I’m going to give this a try tonight.

  3. Yes, a blender should work. I wouldn’t expect it to do the pepper and garlic real well, though, so make sure those are crushed before you add them.

  4. beautiful as ever

  5. Oh! I’m going to try this! Thank you!

  6. Wow that looks really good! I think I’ll try making it tonight. It’s similar to the first homemade vinaigrette I ever made, which I liked a lot, the recipe is here: http://thepauperedchef.com/2009/12/is-salad-dressing-the-perfect-sauce.html

  7. On the first try I didn’t like the strong flavor of the olive oil, but I’ll let it sit overnight for the flavors to meld and try again tomorrow. Also it’s not as thick as yours cause I made it with a hand-held mixer instead of a food processer, but I don’t think that would affect the flavor all that much. Maybe it’s the brand of olive oil too…

  8. if you use regular mustard rather than dry (i use a dijon i like – maille), it will help start the emulsification process, and you don’t need to use a food processor. a fork will be enough.

Trackbacks

  1. […] potatoes Italian dressing grated Parmigiano Reggiano […]

Tip Jar

Like what you see? Buy me a drink.